Progress Doesn’t Happen Overnight

Jennifer Cornthwaite | Photo by Krystal Ramirez

Jennifer Cornthwaite | Photo by Krystal Ramirez

We’ve reported on our concerns when it comes to Downtown. Now, it’s the neighborhood’s movers and shakers’ turn. In our new guest column series, Talking Downtown, bar owners, entrepreneurs and other stakeholders vent their frustrations, champion successes and muse on improvements. Check back every Thursday for a new column. 

I’ve lived Downtown for seven years, half of my time in Las Vegas. No, I wasn’t born here but yes I’m a Runnin Rebel. I have a baby that was born in the Scotch 80’s, yes that is a humble brag that I had my daughter in my bedroom with no drugs, because it was rad.

I just left my daughter for an extended vacation for the first time since she was born and I swear when I came back she was speaking in full sentences and had new preferences. She had changed so much. I don’t tell you this story as if you are interested in the advancements of a 2-year-old, my 2-year-old to make it worse. What I did think about in coming back after almost two weeks was how good it felt to be home.

When so much of Las Vegas is about instant gratification, the slow steady burn of revitalization comes with aching growing pains that seem to never end.

We can have conversation after conversation about Downtown. Gripes and complaints, anger and elation but we can do it at a really beautiful juice bar or at a cute toy store or at a great Mexican restaurant that was for so long, an empty laundry building for what seemed like 100 years.

When so much of Las Vegas is about instant gratification, the slow steady burn of revitalization comes with aching growing pains that seem to never end. We see the images of a casino crashing to the ground in a few seconds, and a new one to take its place all the way down to the little hotel soaps carefully placed in the bathroom for opening day all in a matter of a few years. If you look away for just a moment it seems that real change happens with the wave of a magic wand.

Downtown is just the opposite. I offer the same advice that any mother would give to her child. The good stuff in life is the stuff you wait for, and patience is a virtue.

Sometimes a vacation is all you need to see the progress. Over the years, I have come to have great friends who simply visit several times a year, or once a year and the conversations are never gripes and complaints, but always lean towards the new, the progress, the change. Mixed into those chats are maybe things that might not be working, or things that need some tweaking, but the overall sentiment is always positive and about the big picture.

I’m not suggesting that taking a vacation to Lake Winnipesauke and taking a vacation from our problems is all that is needed to cure what ails us. What I am suggesting is just a humble one. Maybe if your conversations have gone into the doom and gloom realm, it’s time to hop in the car and head out of town for a little headspace.

I will patiently wait for the next seven years. I know it’s going to be a good ride.

Interested in writing a guest column? Email us

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